Category: video

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The shrimp have been together for a few weeks, and we’ve got eggs!!! You can see the brown area on her belly, where she’s carrying them between her flappers.

I’m pretty sure this is the new girl, not Mario, but I’m not sure why she’s building? Usually he does that.

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Some bad storms moved through yesterday. We spotted some rotation in the clouds and stepped outside to watch, just found out this morning that while I was out recording there was a tornado about four miles away. Whoops.

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Rescaped Arp’s tank yesterday! I’m working on a wintery decoration for the front!

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Fed Stephen tonight!!! He accidentally chased the shrimp before honing in on the worms!

(This video was taken from the fairly new letsgetsalty instagram, HowRefreshingHowShrimp, which you can check out if you’d like~)

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I found some touch-me-nots (Mimosa pudica)! They’re able to move so fast

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The black ray goby – now named Winonia! – has gotten bold enough to move to the front of the tank! She’s already sharing pistol shrimp with Yoshi, I’m hoping they’ll start living together!

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he protec, he attac, but most importantly, he share him snac

Guess who’s back? Back again?

montereybayaquarium:

montereybayaquarium:

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Tuna crabs are back—tell a friend! Once again, swarms of pelagic red crabs—aka tuna crabs, Pleuroncodes planipes—beached themselves In Monterey yesterday.

First seen in October of last year, there have been a handful of these mass strandings of juvenile crabs—a normal part of the lifecycle of this species—during our 2015-2016 El Niño. 

Pushed northward by currents and pleasant climes, tuna crabs are one of the most prominent indicators of these changed seas at the hands of El Niño. They were last seen in Monterey during the 1982-1983 ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation).

Hot on the tails of these tasty treats are hordes of blue whales—twenty individuals were spotted recently near Moss Landing! We even saw a blue whale lunge feeding on the surface from the back deck of the Aquarium, perhaps drawn in by fresh and delicious Mexican food.

As the ocean continues to warm due to climate change, these events may become more commonplace in our area, as southern seas slowly slink north. 

The return of the tuna crabs is a reminder that slight changes in temperature can drastically affect the community of animals living in the ocean—and bring a trip to Mexico to our backyard.

You can learn more about tuna crabs in our blog posts:

El Niño is feeling kinda crabby!

They’re baaaaaaack!

What does it mean?

Back on our bull like a cowboy—pelagic red crabs are back again!!

This year, NOAA has predicted an approximately 80% chance for El Niño conditions through the winter in the Northern Hemisphere—and if this stranding is any indication, there’s a good chance an ENSO tour bus has dropped off its first batch of southern visitors to Monterey Bay!

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The two pygmy sunfish are buds now! They’ve acted a tad bit aggressive, but usually just hang out. From what I’ve noticed they tend to stay in groups of two or three in the wild.

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Added the new friends! They’re all looking great. I’ve noticed the wild caught fish seem to adjust a lot faster if there are already other fish in the tank